Sunday, August 3, 2008

Lewis and Clark Bridge

Across the Columbia River


The Lewis and Clark Bridge, which is a cantilever type, spans the Columbia River between Longview, Washington and Rainier, Oregon. It is the only bridge spanning the river between Portland and Astoria, Oregon, and is located 66 miles (106 km) from the Pacific Ocean. This photo was taken from the west along U.S. Highway 30.


Lewis and Clark Bridge


The bridge was open on March 29, 1930 as a privately owned bridge named the Longview Bridge. The $5.8 million cost was recovered by tolls, $1.00 for cars and $.10 for pedestrians. At the time it was the longest and highest cantilever bridge in the United States. The state of Washington purchased the bridge in 1947 and the tolls were removed in 1965 after the bridge was paid for. In 1980 the bridge was rededicated as the Lewis and Clark Bridge in honor of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. The deck was replaced in 2003–04 at a cost of $29.2 million.


View of Bridge Construction from Inside
Martha shot this through the front windshield.
Remember in an earlier post, the moral to the story was,
"Keep the Front Windshield Clean"


The bridge is 8,288 ft. (2.5 km) long with 210 ft. (64 m) of vertical clearance. The main span is 1200 ft. (366 m) long and the top of the bridge is 340 ft. (104 m) above the river. It was designed by Joseph Strauss, engineer of the Golden Gate Bridge.

For a sense of scale and perspective, notice the large red cargo ship on the Columbia River and the herd of Black Angus cows in the pasture.


River Traffic at the Port of Longview and Bridge



Map showing the location of the Lewis and Clark Bridge, Longview, and Columbia River.


Topo Map

Have you ever crossed this bridge?
Have you ever crossed this river? Where?
Leave a comment.


For more Bridges, head over to Runes TX-Blog


Photos by Martha
Map by Troy
.

23 comments:

Your EG Tour Guide said...

No, I have never crosed that bridge. Sad, huh? I have been to Washington but not to Oregon.

david mcmahon said...

That second shot is wonderful.

Doug Taron said...

As always, it's a great set of pictures. I have crossed the bridge twice. Once in the late 1980s while visiting a friend who had moved to Portland. The other was 4 years ago when we did a driving tour of coastal Washington and Oregon while out celebrating my partner's high school reunion in southwest Oregon.

Lew said...

I'm with David on the tunnel effect of the bridge structure. Great photo! It's also fascinating what could be done privately in the past and that such projects are being pushed again today.

Anne-Berit said...

Oh my...,that is an amazing Bridge.I have never seen anything like it!

imac said...

This Bridge post is wonderful, Great photos and lots on info.

RuneE said...

That was bridge worth crossing! Designed by a famous man and named after a famous expedition , and very well documented - it just had to be a great post.

PS No, I have never crossed it, but would very much have liked to do so. The nearest I have been is in Seattle, Washington.

Stanley said...

Nice shot! Love the second one, its really different.

Liv said...

Nice brigde, nice shots. I really like that second shot. Should have loved to be there.........

Hyde DP said...

The windscreen view is marvellous - somehow I think that, showing every rivet, is even more spectacular than the long view.

It reminds me just a little of the Forth Bridge (over the river Forth, NOT the 4th) near Edinburgh but that is a rail bridge.

fishing guy said...

Troy: Certainly an interesting post. I have read a lot and watched DVD's of Lewis and Clark and their travels are really special.

Michael Palmer said...

Ditto on the 2nd bridge shot-- I love the lines and effect

The Texican said...

No Troy, I've never been to that part of the country except to land in Seattle on the way to Alaska. Martha did a great job of cleaning the windshield before she made that second photo. :) Pappy

raf said...

Splendid work you do, Troy and Martha, with every aspect of your blog. Thank you so much for sharing your wealth of images, knowledge and travel logs with us!
Have crossed this river many times over the years, mostly at the mouth of the Columbia.

Pernille's ting og tang said...

Wonderful bridge! I love big bridges like yours! You have done a fantastic job to day:)

nwlimited said...

Crossed it many times...never on foot or bicycle, only in cars.
LOVE your pictures.
My maternal grandfather was involved in the construction of this bridge, and when it was nearing completion, he stood on his head on the highest span.
Gives me the willies to think about that...he was not a bit afraid of heights.
Did you get to the Astoria-Megler bridge, too?
Going to look at some of your other posts, I agree about that clean windshield shot. It's superb!

L.

AphotoAday said...

Yes, I certainly have been across that bridge a few times, with my parents as a lad (they were originally from Washington State, so we visited up there regularly), and a time or two on my own when I was older on my trips out to Astoria.. --By the way, did you know that there is actually another much smaller Lewis and Clark Bridge in Astoria?

Ah yes, now you've got me thinking about the Lewis and Clark Trail and my trips to Idaho and Montana... I sure got around a lot more than I do now... Thanks for the memories...

Best regards, Don.

kjpweb said...

Nope - never been there, never done that! :(
Enjoyable and informative post (as always)!
Cheers, Klaus

Bob Johnson said...

Lol, very cool advice about the front windshield, you just never know when you might get an excellent shot, love it.

Louise said...

Nice pictures! I didn't see the post about the windshield glass, but WHAT A THOUGHT! Shouldn't take a rocket scientist to figure that one out, but in my world, apparently it does, sometimes!

Travis said...

What a bridge. Looks like a great place for photos. Thanks for sharing it with us.

alicesg said...

Beautiful bridge and lovely scenery.

Pearl Maple said...

Followed your link from Sky Watch Friday. Lots of lovely photos here in your blog to look at and all with an interesting story.