Friday, May 9, 2008

Washing Spider Webs

Hanging them out to Dry

After washing them
Hanging in the cool fresh air
Reusable is best


(Click on the photo to survey any washer damage)


Does anyone crochet or knit ? I need repairs !
It's so hard to keep them straight on the clothes line.

See comments for more Orb Facts

Troy
.


26 comments:

Texas Travelers said...

Some Orb-weaver facts:

The orb-weaver spiders (family Araneidae) are the builders of spiral wheel-shaped webs often found in gardens, fields and forests. The family is a large one, including over 2800 species in over 160 genera worldwide, making it the third largest family of spiders known (behind Salticidae and Linyphiidae). The oldest known orb-weaving spider is Mesozygiella dunlopi, with specimens in amber dating from the Early Cretaceous.

Generally, orb-weaving spiders are three-clawed builders of flat webs with sticky spiral capture silk. The building of a web is an engineering feat, begun when the spider floats a line on the wind to another surface. The spider secures the line and then drops another line from the center, making a "Y". The rest of the scaffolding follows with many radii of non-sticky silk being constructed before a final spiral of sticky capture silk. The third claw is used to walk on the non-sticky part of the web. Characteristically, the prey insect that blunders into the sticky lines is stunned by a quick bite and then wrapped in silk. If the prey is a venomous insect, such as a wasp, wrapping may precede biting.

Some "orb-weavers" do not build webs at all. Members of the genera Mastophora in the Americas, Cladomelea in Africa and Ordgarius in Australia produce sticky globules, which contain a pheromone analog. The globule is hung from a silken thread dangled by the spider from its front legs. The pheromone analog attracts male moths of only a few species. These get stuck on the globule and are reeled in to be eaten. Interestingly, both types of bolas spiders are highly camouflaged and difficult to locate.

The spiny orb-weaving spiders in the genera Gasteracantha and Micrathena look like plant seeds or thorns hanging in their orb-webs. Some species of Gasteracantha have very long horn-like spines protruding from their abdomens.

One feature of the webs of some orb-weavers is the stabilimentum, a crisscross band of silk through the center of the web. It is found in a number of genera, but Argiope, which includes the common garden spider of Europe as well as the yellow and banded garden spiders of North America, is a prime example. The band has been hypothesized to be a lure for prey, a marker to warn birds away from the web and a camouflage for the spider when it sits in the center of the web.

Most arachnid webs are vertical and the spiders usually hang with their head downward. A few webs, such as those of orb-weaver in the genus Metepiera have the orb hidden within a tangled space of web. Some Metepiera are semi-social and live in communal webs. In Mexico such communal webs have been cut out of trees or bushes and used for living fly paper.

Reference: WikiPedia

JunieRose2005 said...

Fantastic web!!!

Junie

Duncan said...

You caught this one nicely Troy and Martha, often it's hard to get the light right to show up the web. BTW, we use the same kind of clothes pegs over here!

Tere said...

Very amusing shot! Did he spiders survive? :)

Neva said...

What a hoot! I love putting clothes on the line but I can't where we live.....nice shot of the spiderweb!

TSannie said...

The only thing that could possibly be more beautiful than that picture is that same spider web heavy with morning dew.

Just beautiful!

No spiders here - still too early in the year.

photowannabe said...

Too, too clever. Love this shot and the way you posted it.

Stacey Huston said...

LOL this is great. I always thought you were supposed to lay them flat to dry..(grin)

Tommy V said...

Very Cool I love it

Cláudia said...

Very interesting. The text and the shot! I love it!

I have a good shot of a spider web too, if want to see...it will be a pleasure.

http://docesencontros.blogspot.com/search/label/Project%20Yellow

AphotoAday said...

Great shot, interesting info.

Mental P Mama said...

That is fantastic.

Madeleine said...

Oh I like this spiderweb, I have been trying to find som but no luck.

I llike your macro photos to, beautiful

zetor said...

Great fun and a great photo.

Travis said...

Great photo. You must have really had your eyes looking to catch this. Very creative and fun post. Thanks for sharing it with us.

fishing guy said...

Troy: Very nicely done, I enjoyed the symmetry of the web. Did it dry on the line?

raf said...

Like a full spinnaker, it tickles the senses. Beautiful catch, Troy. So difficult to get the right angle on spider webs to show. Thanks for the info too.

raf said...

Like watching a kite or a full spinnaker, it tickles the senses somehow. Nice take on the web, Troy. Getting a spider web to show in a photo is a bit tricky with light and angles. Thanks for the interesting info as well.

Thiên said...

That's a cool shot and a funny caption. :) Hope you both have a great weekend!

starnitesky said...

Brilliant photo! Just caught the light right. Thank you for visiting my blog. I also liked your P choices on Wednesday.

Texas Travelers said...

.
To All:

Thanks for the nice comments on this fun post.

Come back for another visit,
Troy and Martha
.

Old Wom Tigley said...

Hi Troy...
Excellent capture and love the humour here...

Carol said...

this makes me wish i had taken this photo... it is stunnung!

i have taken photos of spider webs before but nothing like this....i enjoyed the write-up on them too...

very nice

Carol said...

this makes me wish i had taken this photo... it is stunnung!

i have taken photos of spider webs before but nothing like this....i enjoyed the write-up on them too...

very nice

Mary said...

Hi Troy and Martha!

Funny! I walked through an orb weaver's web last summer and got a case of the stickies that ruined my eyeglasses. Unknowingly, I carred the spider into the house on my head. Found an orb weaver's web hanging from the ceiling fan in the sunroom the next morning. The memory still gives me the chills but I do love watching their handiwork!

Mary

evlahos said...

very neat shot