Saturday, June 7, 2008

The Eyes Have It

Camera Critter Tip of the Day

When photographing willing subjects and you have the time, always focus on the eye. This is especially true when doing Macro (micro) photography.

The heart and soul lives in the eyes. Click on the link in the discussion to learn more about compound eyes.

Click on the photos to have a better look at the eye.


Stream Cruiser (Didymops transversa)
Dragonfly



Kiowa Dancer (Argia immunda)
Damselfly
female


The Damselfly (Suborder Zygoptera) is an insect in the Order Odonata. Damselflies are similar to dragonflies, but the adults can be differentiated by the fact that the wings of most damselflies are held along the body when at rest. Furthermore, the hindwing of the damselfly is essentially similar to the forewing, while the hindwing of the dragonfly broadens near the base, caudal to the connecting point at the body. Damselflies are also usually smaller, weaker fliers than dragonflies, and their eyes are separated.

Damselflies undergo incomplete metamorphosis, with an aquatic nymphal stage. The female lays eggs in water, sometimes in underwater vegetation, or high in trees in bromeliads and other water-filled cavities. Nymphs are carnivorous, feeding on daphnia, mosquito larvae, and various other small aquatic organisms. The gills of damselfly nymphs are large and external, resembling three fins at the end of the abdomen. After moulting several times, the winged adult emerges and eats flies, mosquitoes, and other small insects. Some of the larger tropical species are known to feed on spiders, hovering near the web and simply plucking the spider from its perch.


A Dragonfly is a type of insect belonging to the order Odonata, the suborder Epiprocta or, in the strict sense, the infraorder Anisoptera. It is characterized by large multifaceted eyes, two pairs of strong, transparent wings, and an elongated body.

Dragonflies typically eat mosquitoes, midges (no-see-ums), and other small insects like flies, bees, and butterflies. They are therefore valued as predators, since they help control populations of harmful insects. Dragonflies are usually found around lakes, ponds, streams and wetlands because their larvae, known as "nymphs", are aquatic. Dragonflies do not bite or sting humans.

Male Dragonflies are capable of hovering followed by rapid acceleration. Some nymphs even hunt on land, an aptitude which could easily have been more common in ancient times when terrestrial predators were clumsier. Giant dragonflies can glide for 20 meters at 10 degrees and a speed of 74 cm per second which is similar to some birds. They capture their prey by clasping them in legs studded with spikes. Prey cannot escape by diving away because dragonflies always attack from below.



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Scroll down 1 post to see the "Columbia River in the Rain" and
scroll down 2 posts to see some "Photographs of Texas".

Troy and Martha

34 comments:

Marcos Santos said...

I returned to comment on the Sky Watch, but I prefer comment here.

fantastic, fantastic, fantastic ......

I am adding your blog to my favorites.

Greetings from Brazil
Marcos Santos

Dina in Jerusalem Hills said...

A whole new world up close. The damselfly looks so delicate.

Dina said...

Oi, excuse me! Just realized the URL in my previous comment will take you to Cairo/Giza (a great blog) instead of to my Jerusalem Hills DP.

ratmammy said...

Wow, an amazing shot!!!

Me & my puppies said...

Yes, every thing looks so different when shooting in macro. The female is beautiful.

Michele (Rocky Mtn.Girl) said...

The first one is almost too close for me... LOL... but I guess you have to love the world of insects but it's still AWESOME.
The Damselfly is very pretty and we have bazillions of these little guys buzzing all over the place. Walking through the woods we will practically be inhaling them right now... LOL.
Rocky Mountain Retreat

Michele (Rocky Mtn.Girl) said...

The majority of the ones that are in full swing as we speak are the pond damsels. I can refer you to a quick little BC website if you are interested. It doesn't have a whole lot of info... but here it is... BC dragonflies and damselflies perhaps you have seen it already.
~Michele~

Shannon H. said...

I have never seen a Damselfly up close like that! Too cool!

Daryl said...

Beautiful .. I love dragonflies ...

:-Daryl

fishing guy said...

Troy: How did you get that close for the first close-up. I didn't know you could pay them to pose.

Picturing of Life said...

omg....what a great shot!

My CC in here Thanks

Juliana RW said...

fantastic shot and lots of info also.

Visit mine also in here Thanks

cocabixinhos said...

I LOVE you photos today!!
Glad I came.

Sue said...

Wow!!!! These are truly amazing shots!! And thank you for explaining about these tiny creatures.

My entry is posted here:

My Life In The Urban Zoo

Stop by if you have a moment, and have a great week ahead!

Misty Dawn said...

Your macro shots take my breath away! They are absolutely AMAZING!!!

May I ask what kind of camera you use?

AppleDebbie said...

The details in your photos are amazing. Wow!

Tammy said...

Very cool! Amazing shots, Misty was raving to me about these pictures.

Duncan said...

Fascinating creatures, Troy and Martha, winter here now so we're not seeing any, but you've got me looking forward to spring!

i beati said...

I must knopw what camera this is omg wow

Island Rambles Blog said...

I must know more about your cameras and your lenses...you probably have posted them all right???? This makes me want to run right out and get a good macro lens...and so crisp and clear...ohhhh drat, your photos all all good no matter.

MyGoodFinds said...

Awesome shots! I haven't been that close to a dragon fly before.

Rhea said...

Amazing, awsome, fantastic, incredible! Great, great photos.

Carletta said...

Congrats on this wonderful capture!

Gattina said...

The picture is beautiful ! but I am not so keen of flies, lol !

Jules said...

Love the close ups. You must have been fast because they don't sit still for long!

Lilli & Nevada said...

what a fantastic shot that is Hope you get to feeling better

Max-e said...

Interesting facts here and stunning photos. And thanks for the tip on photographing insects. I have never thought to focus on the eye.

Rhea said...

I keep forgetting you're IN Fort Worth!! Very cool. I'm just north of Dallas.

That is one DIRTY Toyota above! I just got a Sequoia. I love it.

Kim said...

Those eyes are amazing and the colors are beautiful.

Sharon said...

These are wonderful closeups!

the teach said...

Incredible post, texas travelers! Your photos are so close and clear! The info on the dragon fly is appreciated! I have a bob cat up! :D

Carole said...

Thanks for the macro tip. Just got a new camera with a good macro setting, and I'll follow the advice. Great shots!

Kittilicious said...

Yuck... but you know what? That is so beautiful!

me ann my camera said...

Your photos are so amazingly clear. The details are perfect. Great photos!